Ryan Scout_FTM

Ryan Sallans, activist and author, transitioned from female to male in 2005 and has recounted his life experiences in his newly released memoir, Second Son: Transitioning Toward My Destiny, Love and Life.

Since he began he has been committed to education surrounding medical, legal and social issues related to the transgender community. This blog serves as a guide and resource for individuals seeking guidance in the transgender community or for friends, family, lovers and partners who are eager to learn more about how a transition may impact the individual's life and those around them.


He has maintained a transition website since 2005 with the goal of helping others through his story and experiences. People can visit his site at: http://www.ryansallans.com
http://www.secondsonmemoir.com
Recent Tweets @rsallans
Top Filipino Singer-Actor Comes Out as a Transgender Man
Last week, one of the most popular singer-actors in the Philippines, Aiza Seguerra, opened up about being transgender on the talk show Aquino & Abunda Tonight.
"Finally I discovered … I’m not a lesbian," he told host Kris Aquino, explaining in both English and Tagalog. "It answered a lot of questions."
He also explained the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity, pointing out that because he is solely attracted to women, he no longer identifies as a gay woman. It’s a distinction some Filipino reporters have struggled with, still commonly referring to Seguerra with female pronouns.
Seguerra, now 31 years old, first rose to fame as a child star, appearing in more than 30 Filipino films and TV shows before he was an adult. He began a successful career as a pop singer and guitarist in his late teens.
No stranger to the headlines, Seguerra has most recently received attention for his announcement that he and his fiancé, model Lisa Diño, plan to travel to the U.S. next year to get married and seek in vitro fertilization treatments so they can have a child.
Seguerra is already a parent to his stepdaughter, though after coming out as trans, he tells Manila’s ABS-CBN News that some have questioned his role in his family.
"Guys, it is expected of them to take care of their family," he responded. "Why can’t I do that? I have my own family now."
SOURCE: http://www.advocate.com/politics/transgender/2014/08/20/top-filipino-singer-actor-comes-out-transgender-man

Top Filipino Singer-Actor Comes Out as a Transgender Man

Last week, one of the most popular singer-actors in the Philippines, Aiza Seguerra, opened up about being transgender on the talk show Aquino & Abunda Tonight.

"Finally I discovered … I’m not a lesbian," he told host Kris Aquino, explaining in both English and Tagalog. "It answered a lot of questions."

He also explained the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity, pointing out that because he is solely attracted to women, he no longer identifies as a gay woman. It’s a distinction some Filipino reporters have struggled with, still commonly referring to Seguerra with female pronouns.

Seguerra, now 31 years old, first rose to fame as a child star, appearing in more than 30 Filipino films and TV shows before he was an adult. He began a successful career as a pop singer and guitarist in his late teens.

No stranger to the headlines, Seguerra has most recently received attention for his announcement that he and his fiancé, model Lisa Diño, plan to travel to the U.S. next year to get married and seek in vitro fertilization treatments so they can have a child.

Seguerra is already a parent to his stepdaughter, though after coming out as trans, he tells Manila’s ABS-CBN News that some have questioned his role in his family.

"Guys, it is expected of them to take care of their family," he responded. "Why can’t I do that? I have my own family now."

SOURCE: http://www.advocate.com/politics/transgender/2014/08/20/top-filipino-singer-actor-comes-out-transgender-man

"After more than 10 hours of public debate, the City Council in Fayetteville, Ark., passed a bill implementing a comprehensive nondiscrimination ordinance, protecting individuals on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in housing, employment, and public accommodations. The ordinance became the subject of national news after TLC’s 19 Kids and Counting matriarch Michelle Duggar recorded a robocall in opposition to the ordinance, using a number of debunked talking points about transgender individuals generally used as scare tactics."

Way to go, Arkansas!

Home, sweet, home.

Hanging at Gender Odyssey! Swing by my booth if you are around.

Hmmmm.

TransJourney is a new documentary following three different trans women lives. 

"Raising children in societies that adhere to rigid gender roles, with fixed ideas about what should be considered “masculine” and “feminine,” can actually be detrimental to their physical and mental health, according to a study that observed 14-year-olds’ interactions over a three month period."

Read the rest of the article by following the link above.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I was wondering how many sessions u went to before getting on t
ryansallans ryansallans Said:

I realized that I was transgender after attending therapy for over five and a half years, so when I came out as transgender to my therapist, we didn’t look at my transition process in relation to sessions, but instead in relation to what would be best for me. Along with talking with my current therapist, I went and saw a second therapist for four sessions to prepare myself/help work out my fears. 

When people come out as transgender and begin to look at the transition process, oftentimes before beginning on hormones, the doctor who prescribes them will ask for a letter from a therapist. For clients who have had a longstanding relationship with a therapist, this may be easier than for clients who have not seen (or just started seeing) a therapist.

In the past, therapist would say they need to see a client for three months for 12 consecutive sessions prior to writing a letter of support. This guideline was part of version six of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards and Guidelines (abbreviated as WPATH SOCv6). In 2011, WPATH released version 7 or (WPATH SOCv7) which has removed the requirements of three months or 12 consecutive sessions. This means now, that when working with a therapist, your decisions and transition path should be guided on how you feel and what the therapist sees as concerns that would prevent them from writing the letter of support.

Therapist concerns may be valid or they may be based on lack of understanding or education around working with transgender clients. It is important for us all to know that there is not a gender specialization certificate or formalized training program that has been professionally vetted that certifies therapist in working with transgender clients. So oftentimes transgender clients may experience road blocks in accessing care. 

Advocate for your health and point misguided professionals to the new and updated resources. 

-Ryan

"The first time a parent of a transgender child asked me for advice, I was thrown for a loop. Ten years ago, I couldn’t quite fathom the reality that a family would actually seek to support their child. Limited as it was, my perception came from the notion that any of us desiring a gender transition had to pursue that as an adult, and that we do so only as a last resort. If anyone were to support our journey, we should feel deeply grateful.

However, a handful of parents had begun looking for guidance. I wondered what resources might exist for families. My search turned up what theirs already had: very little. Written resources, knowledgeable providers and inclusive policies at schools were all things that these parents expected to find but were extremely scarce.

I launched an event solely for these families — the Gender Odyssey Family Conference — followed by a year-round support group at Seattle Children’s Hospital. It didn’t take long for the group to grow from two families to four, from four to eight. As time passed, we filled our meeting room to the bursting point. A second group was formed, then a third, fourth and fifth. We used to hear from a new family once or twice a month. Now it’s daily.”

Read the rest of Aidan Key’s article by following the link!

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From Scout Publishing sharing expressions of gender, sexuality and identity.